learning

Why I Don't Believe in Learning Styles Anymore

Why I Don't Believe in Learning Styles Anymore

A while back I listened to Pat Flynn’s podcast episode with Derek Halpern about selling. In the episode, Derek explains his POD technique for writing sales copy. But before he described his framework, he said something that I had never heard anyone else say out loud: you don’t just have one target customer, you have multiple.

Derek was right. (You have customer segments.) And yet, countless Internet gurus spread the myth that you have a single ‘customer avatar.’

(Sidebar: there is a good reason why people tell you this but it sends us down a rabbit hole, so let’s ignore it, k?)

The same is true with learning styles. They’re a myth. At best, they're an outdated theory on how we learn.

How to design for obstacles in your online course

How to design for obstacles in your online course

Creating an online course isn’t just about making your content look pretty. To create online courses that change lives, you’ve got to consider all the things.

Like where your learner is when they start your course and where they want to end up.

This is called your learner journey. It’s a great way to put yourself in your learner’s shoes. But there’s another aspect that’s often overlooked.

Obstacles.

Your students will have resistance to changing habits and behavior. Not to mention trying to finish your course while dealing with kids, a full-time job, aging parents, and all the other stuff that tries to poo on our goals.
 
How are you, dear course creator, going to design for that?

Back To Top↑